Three Systems of Land Ownership That We Tend to Find All Over the World

There are some three systems of land ownership that we tend to find all over the world.

The first system of land ownership that we tend to find in some parts of the world is the system where land is largely owned by private individuals, with private titles. This is the system that you tend to find in countries that have fully embraced capitalism. If, for instance, you check through the records at the United States Bureau of Land Management, you are likely to discover that a sizeable portion of the land in the USA is in private hands. But reflecting deeper on the US system, you are likely to discover that it is actually a hybrid between the first system and the second system that we will be looking at below. That is because under the US system, while the land is under individual hands, the individuals in question are actually said to have ‘leased’ it from the state: with leases that normally expire with time. And indeed the people pay hefty land taxes to the government: with the amounts charged being almost like ‘rent’ payments for the land.

The second system of land ownership that we tend to find in some parts of the world is where the land is largely owned by the state. People seeking to use the land have to lease it from the state: they can’t own it individually.

The third system of land ownership that we tend to find in some parts of the world is where the land is largely owned by communities, with community titles. Members of the communities can then request for land from the communities, and proceed to use it – but all the while remembering that the land is owned by the communities.